Wednesday, August 26, 2015

 

What are the "Good Questions" in Ufology?


Recently, Mark OC (the blogger of highstrangenessUFO.com) announced he was going to be a guest on Martin Willis's Podcast UFO (podcastufo.com), on September 9, 2015.

Willis asked him to prepare a list of questions about ufology that he could talk about.

The list is actually pretty interesting, and with additional questions added by readers of the blog in the comments, it's a good set of things that could be asked about the subject, really covering the waterfront.

We'll see what Mark has to say.

Here's his list, plus the added ones by others.

1.       Triangles or circles?
2.       If an alien said "Take me to your leader" to you, who would you take it to?
3.       Would you rather be abducted on a lonely road or in your bedroom?
4.       What is there to say about Rendlesham Woods, really?
5.       Can the Drake Equation beat the Fermi Paradox in a fair fight?
6.       Which cable TV UFO show does the best -- or the least worst -- reenactments of UFO cases?
7.       Who would you least want to meet up with in a dark alley in Roswell: a grey, a Reptoid, a mantis or a 'Majic Man'?
8.       Why hasn't 'Disclosure' happened yet?
9.       When will 'Disclosure' happen?
10.   What will happen the day after 'Disclosure'?
11.   What will happen the next day?
12.   When will you be taking over MUFON?
13.   What happened to the rest of Joe Simonton's pancakes?
14.   Should the 'Three strikes, you're out' rule apply to Roswell 'smoking guns'?
15.   Interplanetary or Interdimensional?
16.   Who's been exploited to the most egregious degree: the Atacama Humanoid or the mummified child in the Roswell Slides?
17.   Why are UFOlogists so grumpy and irritable?
18.   What's the worst UFO/alien movie ever made?
19.   Which is your favorite level in Dulce Base?
20.   Should Kenneth Arnold have just kept his lip zipped?

And then:

21.   Out of all the UFO experts, who would you like to have with you in the event of an abduction?
22.   Orthon or Aura Rhanes?
23.   Would you rather be taken for a ride to Venus, Clarion, Zeta Reticuli, or the Pleiades?
24.   Is George Adamski really a distant relative of Billy Meier?
25.   What is your favorite UFO conspiracy theory?
26.   How much does Element 115 really weigh?
27.   What alien species is most likely to honor a secret treaty?
28.   What kind of food did they serve at a Restaurant X?
29.   Have you seen any good slides lately?
30.   When was the last really good UFO crash?
31.   Is there anything we should know about planetary alignments, comets, or 19.5 degrees?
32.   Is Alien Amber a better brew than UFO Hefeweizen?
33.   Does MUFON have a secret signal that can be used in the event of an abduction?
34.   As Jimi asked, are you experienced?
35.   Have the Men in Black warned you against answering these questions?

Also:

36.   What is MAJIC's worst kept secret? Their best kept secret?
37.   What is the secret that you are pledged not to reveal about Roswell?
38.   What is Plan 10 from outer space?
39.   If you could solve any UFO mystery, what would it be?
40.   Are some high strangeness matters better left strange?

And finally,


41.   "Is Nick Redfern actually an alien, and I don't just mean is he from Great Britain?"

I'll post my own replies soon. (I doubt that they can be called "answers.")

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Comments:
On Twitter, recently, Jack Brewer and I made statements about what in ufology puzzled us. I'll edit them into question form here.

Jack: Given the conclusive evidence of the unreliability of hypnosis to retrieve memory, why is it still defended?

TTC: Given the inability of polygraph tests to reliably determine truth, why were they given to every major abduction claimant?

To me, using these unproven methods to "confirm" unproven claims pushes ufology out of science and lands it decisively into the pseudoscience category.

 
@Terry - this is true as long as we also concede that *failing* a polygraph has been used by others to debunk claims. On that side of the fence, failing a test proved they were lying and passing the test proved the equipment, results or analysts were wrong. It seems like guys on all sides like to ask for 'do-overs' until they get the answers they wanted.

My question: Is ufology just Cluedo for nerds?
 
> *failing* a polygraph has been used by others to debunk claims.

I would not accept a negative polygraph as evidence. Polygraph tests are meaningless either way.

(But that does not excuse APRO for covering up Travis Walton's "failed" polygraph test.)
 
> Is ufology just Cluedo for nerds?

When we need to feel a cheap thrill or some temporary dread, we go see a bad movie, usually a suspenseful sci-fi or horror movie.

Ufology seems to be an attempt to have these same feelings, but into real life.

But I am guessing. I don't have this need.
 
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